Health & Wellness

More than 30 Southern Nevada hospitals and medical centers offer high-quality care from some of the finest physicians and medical professionals in the country. New hospital development over the past several years has afforded health care centers the opportunity to incorporate the latest technology into their facilities. While finding health care providers in a new city can feel overwhelming, the following information was designed to help ease the burden for new residents.

Finding a Doctor

There are several ways to find a doctor who fits the needs of you and your family. Consider the following points when looking for physicians:

Check your health plan. If your employer offers health insurance, visit your company's human resources office. Most members of health plans must choose physicians within their plan.

Family, friends and co-workers are a good resource for finding a physician. Ask what people like best and least about their doctors.

Determine how important location is to you. Also, evaluate if gender and age are an important consideration.

When searching for a physician, make sure the doctor is board certified. All U.S. board-certified physicians are listed with the American Board of Medical Specialties. Visit abms.org or call 866.272.2267. The American Medical Association provides information about U.S. licensed physicians at ama-assn.org.

Research potential doctors through the State of Nevada Board of Medical Examiners medboard.nv.gov. This site can help you verify that a medical doctor, physician assistant or practitioner of respiratory care has a state medical license. For additional information, you can call the Nevada State Board of Medical Examiners at 888.890.8210 (toll-free from within the state of Nevada) and press "0."

If you are searching for a D.O. (doctor of osteopathic medicine), call the Nevada State Board of Osteopathic Medicine at
702.732.2147.

Staying Healthy in a Desert Climate

Dehydration in a desert climate can be a serious concern. In humid climates, perspiration stays on the skin. In the desert, perspiration evaporates from skin almost immediately, leaving a person with no indication of how much salt and water has been lost. You may not even feel thirsty, but you can't always rely on thirst as an indicator of fluid loss.

When outdoors, consume at least three to four quarts of fluid per day, preferably water. When engaging in physical activity, increase fluid intake to four to six quarts. Be aware that sodas, coffee, tea and alcohol can contribute to dehydration, so drink these beverages in moderation.

If you become light-headed, the Clark County Health District recommends stopping all activity and moving to a cool or shaded area immediately. Should dehydration set in, soaking in a tub of tepid water and drinking plenty of fluids, especially sports drinks, will replace electrolytes.

In addition to dehydration, people living in desert climates may experience swelling of the feet and ankles, usually after prolonged periods of walking or sitting. Elevating the legs may bring some relief. Later, as you become acclimated to the climate, the swelling will most likely disappear altogether.

Hospitals

Some of the finest and most advanced medical centers are members of the Las Vegas Chamber of Commerce. Find a hospital that will serve your health care needs in Las Vegas.

Prescription Drugs

Did you know that being a Nevada resident entitles you and your family to a FREE Discount Prescription Drug Card program? Simply download your Nevada Prescription Drug Card from LVChamber.com and you could receive savings of up to 75 percent at more than 50,000 national and regional pharmacies. You can create a card for every member of your family. Participating pharmacies include the following:

  • Albertsons/Sav-on Pharmacy
  • Kmart Pharmacy
  • VONS
  • CVS/pharmacy
  • Raley's Pharmacy
  • Longs Drug Store
  • Safeway
  • Target
  • Wal-Mart
  • Kroger
  • Thousands of independent pharmacies

Who is Eligible?
All Nevadans, even if you have insurance coverage. This program is already used by people who have Health Savings Accounts, high deductible plans and Medicare Part D for non-covered drugs. There are no enrollment forms, no age or income restrictions, no exclusions and no annual limits on this program's use. Nevada Drug Card utilizes "lowest price logic" to guarantee that you pay the lowest price on your prescriptions. You simply pay the lower of a discount off the Average Wholesale Price (AWP), a discount calculated off MAC Pricing or the Pharmacy Promotional/Retail price. This card is pre-activated and can be used immediately.

Click here for more information, and to download your cards.